Manic Monday

I gotta say, it’s really fun doing this little project of mine, delving into a random genre via one artist at a time really keeps things interesting for me; I think I know what I’m getting into, but sometimes I get thrown a curveball. For example, diving into The Bangles for the past week was not just a stroll down 1980’s summer pop lane as I expected.

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Initially, The Bangles took a lot of influence from 60’s rock and British invasion rock then mixed in a bit of New Wave; you can tell by the tones on their guitars and general playing style and effects. It’s fun to listen to, and some of their hits will be known for generations (even if occasionally in a mocking way).

If you only listen to the stuff released in the 80’s you’ll get mostly what you expect, as well as a few other gems that I can’t believe I haven’t heard before. There are some awesome tracks that I am so glad I found and will be happy to listen to again in the future.

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What a lot of people probably don’t know, however, is that the band reunited in 2000 after having broken up in 1989. They have released two albums since then, Doll Revolution in 2003, and Sweetheart of the Sun in 2011. When I started listening to The Bangles for this post, I started at the most recent album and worked my way back. I gotta say, They have been up to some good stuff.

Their newer songs hold true to the spirit of their original sound, keeping things fun and their instrumentation similar though probably with more modern gear; I can’t hear as much of the 80’s signature synth as is in their earlier work, and the overall production quality is better. Their vocals are the same in style, though the voices themselves are a little more mature. I can hear a bit more Psychedelic rock influence than I anticipated, but maybe I should have expected that.

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The bangles older stuff is great as well. There are the classics which most people know, primarily “Walk Like An Egyptian” “Manic Monday” and “Eternal Flame”, as well as some great other songs. I was especially a fan of “James” and “Going Down To Liverpool”

Overall, I am pleases with their library. The Bangles are more than “Walk Like An Egyptian”, though that is a great song. Really, it has an awesome groove, fun vocal arrangement, and great tones. It’s a bit silly and very fun, which is sometimes exactly what you want. I mean, just look at this picture:

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Here are my top tracks for The Bangles, from newest to oldest:

“Anna Lee (Sweetheart of the Sun)”

“Under a Cloud”

“Open My Eyes”

“Mesmerized”

“Tear Off Your Own Head (It’s a Doll Revolution)”

“Eternal Flame”

“Manic Monday” Fun fact, this song was written by Prince.

“Walk Like An Egyptian”

“James”

“Going Down To Liverpool”

I definitely recommend you listen to “Under a Cloud” and “James”, those might be my favorite two finds for this band. I couldn’t find a good video for “Under a Cloud”, so to give you an idea of their more recent songs here’s a video for “Anna Lee” in what looks like an acoustic session:

I think that’s it for this post, onwards to another genre shift: we’re gonna hit up the Barenaked Ladies for the next one, and I’m super excited to see what they’ve got for me!

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Casual Party

A few years ago I had a roommate who I bonded with over music. She has fantastic taste, and I was really excited when she burned a CD for me with a mix of recommended music. One of the tracks soon became a favorite, “The Funeral” by Band of Horses.

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It’s a great song and a great intro to the band. Band of horses has a number of fairly popular songs, depending on what kind of music you follow. I would categorize them as indie/folk rock, though an argument could be made for alt-rock as well. I have heard some of their songs on the radio when I’m listening to the community stations or the community alt-rock station. Since I’m living in Utah, I assume their song “Great Salt Lake” gets played here with more frequency than other areas.

There are a couple songs I want to highlight here before my usual top tracks list. Firstly, “Dumpster World” which when I first heard it made me think heavily of the band America, specifically the song “Horse With No Name” because that’s probably the song by them I’m most familiar with (I’ll need to do a separate post about America somewhere down the line). The resemblance is pronounced at the beginning of “Dumpster World” and I haven’t been able to find out if the similarity is intentional or not. I can’t imagine it isn’t, though. The vocal harmonies and instrumentation style is ridiculously similar. In fact, I’ll add a couple links so you can compare the two songs.

What do you think? Purposeful?

Secondly, I want to point out “No One’s Gonna Love You” which is definitely one of their most popular songs. It’s a fantastic song, one that I think anyone can enjoy, but even more interesting to me is the Cee Lo Green cover version. I know a lot of people have strong opinions about cover songs. Some people claim only the original version of any song is best, though I disagree. For example, Hendrix’s version of “All Along The Watchtower” is much more well known at the very least, if not arguably better than the original by Bob Dylan. Or another example, “Hallelujah” originally by Leanord Cohen. My own personal opinion is that if a cover version adds something or changes the song in some way then more power to them.

That’s pretty much how I feel about the Cee Lo cover. It’s a great version of the song, and his voice is so unique it lends itself to new interpretations easily. Here are two more links for you to compare them:

Wrapping up, here’s my top tracks list for Band of Horses:

“No One’s Gonna Love You”

“The Funeral”

“Casual Party”

“Dull Times/The Moon”

“Dumpster World”

“Compliments”

“A Little Biblical”

“The General Specific”

So that’s pretty much all I have to say about Band of Horses. They are a great band, and if you like groups like The Shins, Fleetfoxes, The National, The Decemberists etc. you will probably love Band of Horses too. They are right up that alley, and a band I would be excited to see live if I ever got the chance.

Lucille

Before we get started, it’s no secret to anyone who knows me that I adore the blues. You can reference my post on Aynsley Lister as well and you’ll see what I mean so I’ll try not to rhapsodize about the many virtues of Blues again. Wouldn’t want to be redundant.

On with the post…

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It is a well-known fact that B.B. King’s guitar is named Lucille.

B.B. King said Lucille was a reminder for him, both not to brawl over a woman and never to run into a burning building. There’s a great story there, and if you listen to his song “Lucille” you’ll hear it in his own words. Playing guitar was B.B. King’s life. It was such a part of him and his style seems to have a personality all it’s own, so I’m not surprised in the least that his guitar had a name. Lucille’s sound is very identifiable, and it was strongly linked to King’s singing voice as well. He would essentially sing duets with Lucille, trading off lyrics in his voice and soulful expression from Lucille.

B.B. King is the prototypical blues guitarist, and the way he plays that lovely guitar Lucille is something that guitarists have striven to emulate for decades. I myself am primarily a bass player, but one day I hope to be proficient enough on the guitar to play delta blues like B.B. King, though I know I’ll never achieve his level of skill.

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B.B. King (whose name was Riley, actually) was heralded as the King of the Blues, along with Freddie King and Albert King, and rightly so. They say it takes 10,000 hours to become an expert at something, and boy was B.B. an expert at the Blues. Something I don’t think a lot of people realize is how much work is involved in being a professional musician. B.B. King wasn’t a great guitar player because he was just naturally gifted. He wasn’t just “discovered” one day – he set out to make it happen. He was a phenomenal musician because he dedicated his life to being so, even at the cost of other things. For example, his two divorces have been attributed to his heavy work schedule, something like 250 performances a year. In fact, in 1956 alone he had 342 performances and three recording sessions. He played and performed until he died, just as he said in his song “Riding With The King”

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B.B. set the stage for blues artists for decades. And let’s be real, if your career is playing a genre of music spans 60-odd years, you probably have had some influence over a lot of musicians.

In fact, B.B. King has more albums on Spotify than Aretha Franklin, more than 70, and I’m not ashamed to admit I lost count. He led an incredibly long career, spanning from 1949 to 2015 when he died. He was a dedicated musician as well as a philanthropist. He was very public about being diagnosed with diabetes, and ultimately it was consequences from his diabetes that led to his death.

If you want to know more about B.B. King’s life and career, I really recommend the official BB King website, there’s a great article on the main page that gets into it a bit more.

I fell into a Youtube rabbit hole in getting ready for this post, and there were too many great videos for me to share. Please feel free to check out some of it, there are tons of amazing videos of him playing with other renowned guitarists. For this post, I’ll stick with this simple version of “Sweet Sixteen”

There are obviously a lot of great songs and albums in his repertoire, though a number of them have repeats and a number are live albums. If I were to suggest any of his Albums, I would first suggest his collaboration with Eric Clapton, Riding With The King, it is now one of my favorite albums ever. I would also suggest Ladies and Gentlemen… Mr. B. B. King, as a fantastic collection of all his best tunes. Don’t disregard his earlier work either, I was jamming out even when I made it back to his albums from the 50’s and 60’s.

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As far as individual songs go, I now have 26 of his songs in my own music library, though I could easily add more. I’ll spare you the whole list and just give you my top 10 favorite tracks. This doesn’t include his collab. stuff, by the way, so feel free to check that out on your own if you’re interested, especially the album Deuces Wild.

Top 10 tracks:

“The Thrill Is Gone” – this song alone has something like 50 versions by B.B. King on Spotify.

“Lucille”

“How Blue Can You Get” It took me a while to realise this was a song sampled in a super chill song I know called “Standing Outside A Broken Phonebooth” by Primitive Radio Gods.

“Ghetto Woman”

“Caldonia”

“Alexis’ Boogie”

“To Know You Is To Love You”

“Sneakin’ Around”

“Is You Or Is You Ain’t (My Baby)”

“Sweet Sixteen”

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Seriously go listen to some B.B. King. Right now. Don’t let this important part of your personal music education get away from you!

You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet

For this post, I was delving into essential 1970’s rock. Seriously, Bachman-Turner Overdrive (hereafter referred to as BTO) is the epitome of classic rock.

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The one song I already had on my Spotify list before checkong out the rest of their library was “Takin’ Care Of Business”. It’s a great song, perfect for staying motivated and getting things done. It has an easy to find beat and it’s a fun song to sing along to. It even has a great breakdown halfway through the song with a rather distinct guitar solo and a great use of piano accenting everything throughout. A great song for the whole band to rock out to.

When I proceeded to dive further into BTO’s music, I realized I knew some of their other stuff already. Seriously, they have a bunch of classic songs people know really well, “Takin’ Care Of Business” being just one of many.

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I did a bit of reading about the band and it’s line-up changes and such, but I really wasn’t interested in that. What I was interested in was the sound they made. I already mentioned they have an iconic ’70’s rock sound, and while all of their work firmly belongs to that genre, they didn’t let anything box them in. They have songs that are pure rock with driving rhythms and guitar solos, but they also have fun playing with different tones for their guitars, use drums to be dynamic as well as driving, balance multiple guitars and tones into a beautifully cohesive way, and throw in some extra elements (such as extra piano or cowbell) to add more flavor to a song.

Thanks to SNL and Christopher Walken, anytime I hear a cowbell I immediately notice it and it becomes all I can focus on during the rest of a song. Luckily, that wasn’t the case for me while listening to BTO, though I wouldn’t necessarily want more of it.

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Altogether, I have been impressed by this band. Great songs that stand the test of time and smooth grooves for me to rock out to are an excellent way to make me a fan. If I were to make a BTO top ten tracks list it would be as follows:

“You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet” – This has a great rhythm guitar pulling it along and an excellent hook as well as a fun lead guitar tone that pops up after the first verse. I’d karaoke the heck out of this one.

“Blue Collar” – Very different in tone than I expected, it has a handful of different guitar tones that really compliment the song beautifully. Seriously, sometimes a wah pedal just pulls me out of the song if it’s too strong or not suited to the rest of the instrumentation, but this was just right. And to pair it with at least 2 other guitar tones vastly different and have it match, plus the very jazzy drums/guitars and tempo change combo at the end, really sell it.

“Takin’ Care Of Business” – As mentioned above.

“Hey You” – A prime example of their overall style. Check it out.

“Roll On Down The Highway” – Great road trip song.

“Lookin Out For #1” – Smooth and chill, comparable to “Blue Collar”

“Not Fragile” – Heavier rock sound, power chord driven.

“It’s Over” – The beginning chord structure made me think of “American Woman” but it’s actually quite different. And pretty awesome.

“Quick Change Artist” – This one is just really fun. Classic BTO style

“Hold Back The Water” – Also awesome. Great use of chorus style vocals.

I guess that’s ten, but if you like those, here’s a bonus: “Welcome Home”

I’ve really enjoyed listening to BTO, and am so glad I know more of their music. I am especially a fan of their guitar work, though the rest of the band are no slouches! This is another group I want to thank our northern neighbors for. Thanks, Canada!

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Go check out this great classic rock band, and happy listening!

 

P.S. If this isn’t the most 70’s picture, I’ll eat my hat*.

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*I won’t actually eat my hat. That would be weird. And indigestible.

Here’s To Never Growing Up

Switching from the Blues last week to the pop skater punk style of Avril Lavigne for this week was a weird transition for me. I had to listen to Avril Lavigne’s music twice to get in the groove of it.

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This is one of those things that I felt I had outgrown. Music like that of Avril Lavigne’s is something I listened to as a teenager and haven’t really looked back on as an adult until now, associating it with other aspects of that time period that I’ve moved on from.

The early 2000’s found me as a young teen branching out my musical tastes and looking for something I could attach myself to. While I never adopted the skate punk style of musicians like Avril Lavigne, I did enjoy her music. I remember having a copy of her first album Let Go and keeping it near my CD player in my room. This type of music is, in my opinion, geared specifically towards teenagers though that could be becauae I was a teenager when I listened to it. It could also be because when Let Go came out Avril was only 17 years old.

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Avril Lavigne has been pursuing music since a young age. She was lucky enough to be supported by her parents in this endeavor throughout her childhood. She signed a record deal in late 2000 at age 15 shortly before her career really took off. Her first album, Let Go, was released in 2002 and threw her right into the spotlight. The album reached pretty high on the Billboard charts in the US, but she also became the youngest female artist to have an album reach number one on the UK Albums Chart at the time. That album had multiple hits on it such as “Complicated” and “Sk8er Boi” which still play on the radio occasionally. Pretty impressive for a 17-year-old.

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I ate up the angsty, emotion-fueled, self-empowering, suburban teen girl rock as a teenager, and listening to it again makes me realize I have a lot of good memories attached to those songs. I didn’t listen to her next album that came out in 2004, though I liked the single “My Happy Ending” that played on the radio.

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The 2007 album, The Best Damn Thing, came out when I had gotten more into music videos. I distinctly remember watching the music video for the single “Girlfriend” on VH1 or MTV (whichever one had actual music videos on at any given point was usually my TV channel of choice). That song became a bit of a guilty pleasure for me as I moved on to other things musically. I think I eventually bought that CD on a whim as well, though I never listened to it much and the only other song on it that stuck out to me at all was “Keep Holding On”

Avril Lavigne fell off my radar almost completely after that, and I haven’t heard anything off of her last two albums until this past week.

Avril’s sound has mostly stayed the same, though overall she has grown a bit as a musician. Not much, but a bit. I’ll never really get into her music again like I did as a teen, though I did quite enjoy the track “Give You What You Like” off her eponymous album, and I’m glad to include it in my library.

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I’m not going to post a top tracks list, but I will say that her first album will always be my favorite; I have good memories of that album. Have I grown out of Avril Lavigne’s music? Yes, but I will always enjoy listening to it and remembering how I felt at that point in my life. To me, this is an important part of my musical history and I would never want to forget it.

That’s all I have for you today, but watch put for my next post featuring Bachman-Turner Overdrive!

 

P.S. Has anyone noticed how she seems to wear more and more eyeliner as time goes on? Check this out:

2002:

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2004:

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2007:

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2011:

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2013:

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That last one. I know it’s specifically a photo shoot for the album, but still. Ridiculous.

I also found some pictures of here without the eyeliner, and she looks completely different. It’s super weird.

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Also, this. This is my favorite:

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Soundman

I am a sucker for blues guitar. Really, there’s nothing like it for me; that raw, heavy, and grinding sound of a funky blues solo being wrenched out of the amp. I am enthralled every time I hear a blues song that really drives it home. Anytime I listen to it, I just want to crank up the volume and let it wash over me.

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There are way too many sub-genres in the blues. Blues is more categorized by the type of scale and arrangement patterns used than anything else, which means it’s a little all-encompassing. For example, the following artists are all known for having songs categorized as blues: Albert King, Ray Charles, Bob Dylan, Norah Jones, Johnny Cash, Jimi Hendrix, Billie Holiday, The Black Keys, ZZ Top, John Mayer, Etta James, Jack White, Led Zeppelin, etc. That’s just a small sampling, and some of those are not anything like another.

Here is a link to a list of blues genres if you’re interested. The page also has a list of blues-like genres at the bottom.

For the sake of the rest of this post, I will be talking about what has been called Texas Blues, the gritty kind of blues-rock I would stereotypically picture being played in a bar on the edge of town frequented by a couple of biker gangs. It is characterized by jazz-influenced improv and single string electric guitar accompaniment. It’s been around since the early 1900’s but really began to flourish in the American south in the late 60’s and 70’s pulling influences from country as well as other blues-rock sounds.

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It is really hard to stand out in a genre that has so many masters. Stevie Ray Vaughn, B. B. King, Muddy Waters, Freddie King, ZZ Top, Eric Clapton, and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. If you can stand out in such a genre, more power to you. Most often when I’m listening to blues, I do so via internet radio stations and don’t actually know what artist I’m listening to at any given time. Occasionally, if I’m listening via Spotify, I’ll save a good song I like to my music library.

Which is exactly how I found the artist that inspired this post. Aynsley Lister is a good guitarist, and I enjoy his compositions. Despite how hard it is for contemporary artists to measure up to the famous blues artists of the past he does an admirable job. I had just one of his songs on my Spotify to start with, called “Soundman”. This song tickled my fancy since I have worked in the live performance industry and with various sound guys in my career; I found the lyrics relatable and humorous, and the guitar style enjoyable.

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Aynsley Lister hails from England and started playing guitar at the ripe old age of 8, performing his first concert at age 13. His guitar work is great, though I admit I find his voice a little annoying at times. Overall, kudos to him for finding something he loves so early on in life and continuing to work on it throughout his career. He’s been performing as a solo artist since 1995 and is still going strong. Well done, sir!

My top 5 tracks for Aynsley Lister are as follows:

“Soundman”

“Crazy” (a fantastic Gnarls Barkley cover)

“Inside Out”

“Upside Down”

“Always Tomorrow”

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Aynsley Lister is a good blues artist, and I’m glad he has inspired me to listen to so much Texas blues this past week or so, I have really enjoyed it! Makes me want to go find a blues bar to just hang out and listen to live music.

Check out some blues music this week! If you have any blues artists you’d like to share with me, I’d love to hear it!

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And here’s a bonus: a clip from the movie Adventures In Babysitting which is where I derived the name of my blog from. Enjoy!

Distraction #74

A few years ago I had a roommate who was an absolutely huge Avett Brothers fan. I am very sad to report I did not take that opportunity to check out their music.

However! I have made up for the lack of The Avett Brothers music in my life since then. I can’t remember when I first actually got into it, but I am very glad I looked a little deeper the last couple of weeks. These guys are fantastic musicians as well as excellent storytellers. I would be so excited to go see one of their shows, everything I’ve heard from their live albums indicates they would be a great band to see perform.

For those that have never heard of The Avett Brothers, let me give you the run down. The band is made up of Scott and Seth Avett as well as Bob Crawford and Joe Kwan. They also have a few other members for live performances. I won’t give you a history of the band here like I have for previous posts. Instead, I’m going to focus on the music.

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This music belongs in the genre of Americana, though it can also be classified as Bluegrass, Folk, Folk Rock, and Indie Folk. For me, Americana music is light and fun, and I feel that reflected in The Avett Brothers songs. They also have some more somber or serious tunes as well, and those are just as good. I can definitely appreciate a band who knows how to balance having ballads and emotional tracks with more uptempo exciting numbers, and The Avett Brothers balance that perfectly.

Their instrumentation is classic Americana most of the time, though they don’t let anything as trivial as genre labels put them in a box. You’ll find that their lyrics are often more similar to alt and indie rock than bluegrass, and their arrangements are fairly a-typical as well. In fact, one of the reasons I love their music so much is that I don’t always know what to expect from them. They always sound like themselves, but their songs don’t sound the same at all; each one of them unique and well-thought out.

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Their most recent popular song “Ain’t No Man” has had quite a bit of radio play, drastically expanding their listener base. It’s a great song and I quite enjoy it, though it has potential to be overplayed so I don’t listen to it much on my own. Another popular song is “I And Love And You” which while distinctly a ballad in it’s tempo and style, also has interesting and visual lyrics that keep you hooked.

The Avett Brothers have many songs I truly enjoy, but none tickled me quite as much as “Distraction #74” which has the most fun vocal arrangement I’ve heard in a long time. These guys are quite good at harmonies and vocal arrangements. Seriously, go listen to that song all the way through. You won’t regret it.

I would like to give you a top 5 songs to listen to by The Avett Brothers but bear with me here. It’s gonna be hard to narrow it down to just 5, so I’ll exclude the songs previously mentioned to thin it out (but those ones are awesome too, go take a listen).

“Kick Drum Heart”

“Satan Pulls The Strings” – this one has a distinctly different instrumentation and is an interesting change of pace.

“Murder In The City”

“Bella Donna”

“Head Full Of Doubt/Road Full Of Promise”

And just cause I can’t help myself, I’ll add another one:

“Slight Figure Of Speech”

Oh, and here’s a great music video for “Head Full Of Doubt/Road Full Of Promise” that I really enjoyed.

This is just a really fun band to listen to. They’ve gained a fan for life in me, and I would encourage anyone to listen to their music. Go check them out!

 

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Frontier Psychiatrist

One thing I love about local radio stations is they don’t play by the rules. You won’t typically tune into your local community radio station and hear the same 40 songs that air on all the other stations. Instead, you hear new music. You hear local artists and international artists. You hear deep cuts and B-sides. You hear genres you never would have tried listening to otherwise. You hear older tunes that don’t get airtime anymore. You hear DJs who want to share things with you, not sell things to you.

I know, I know; that is a romanticization of community radio and a rather naive look at how they work. However, I believe that is what those stations should aspire to. Yes, you will hear repeat songs, sometimes multiple times a day. I got pretty sick of Portugal. The Man for a little while when my local station played “Feel It Still” 5 times a day over the summer, but I still prefer that to standard radio.

Commercials.

Enough said.

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I occasionally find songs from my local high school station, KOHS, and my local community station, KRCL, that push my musical boundaries. For example, I had never been into club music/electronica most likely due to my exposure to that style being limited to the basic beats you hear on standard radio stations and at dance parties (not my thing either). To me, it just sounded like an overdose of dubs, wubs, and wahs that get old really fast. Especially when you start getting headaches, and… Just, no thanks. It’s not for me.

However, my eyes have been opened somewhat. I believe that epiphany began with a song I heard a few years ago on KOHS, “Frontier Psychiatrist” by The Avalanches.

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The Avalanches are a group from Australia who is fairly hard to describe. Their first album has a supposed 3,500 different audio clips sampled into it. After listening to that album, I believe it. The things these guys do are amazing, weaving hundreds of separate samples together to create one cohesive song is a ton of work. I couldn’t do it, though I can certainly appreciate it. And they even do live performances of their music; at one point they had 4 sets of turntables onstage at once along with other various instruments.

I looked up the Wikipedia page for the group as well as read a few blurbs describing them, and I can’t say I have ever found a band before whose genre has been described as Plunderphonics or Neo-Psychedelia before. They also hold the labels of Electronic and Hip-hop, and while I can hear that in their music, that description doesn’t do justice to the complex and nuanced sounds produced by The Avalanches.

Here’s the video for “Frontier Psychiatrist” if you’re interested. It was a runner-up in the Soho Shorts Film Festival in the UK; it’s pretty weird, but it fits the song really well.

This music has a groove to it that is persevering. Something they do really well are transitions between tracks. If you listen to their first album, Since I Left You, the transitions are completely seamless. It’s pretty hard to tell when one song ends and another begins. That makes picking out favorite tracks kind of difficult, so I recommend listening to the album straight through if you feel like giving this band a shot. And if you like that album, make sure to check out Wildflowers as well. It has less of a continuous feel, and they feature a lot of other guest artists that amplify the music deftly. All in all, an excellent follow up to the first album.

If you would like my top 5 tracks instead of listening to an album, here they are:

“Frontier Psychiatrist”

“Because I’m Me”

“Going Home”

“Since I Left You”

“Colours”

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Who knows if we can expect another album from this group. I would like to hear more of their music, but it did take them 16 years to put out a second album. It might take longer for a third, or maybe there just won’t be another one.

In the end, I’m still pretty picky about electronic and club music (frequently the only thing I get out of it is a headache). But I will always at least give it a shot, I never know when I might end up really liking it.

Im glad I found this group, it is completely different than anything I was listening to previously and I feel it illuminates the boundless ways we can pursue music. I hope I continue finding new musical innovations for the rest of my life as well as try to keep a more open mind to new things, even the ones that give me headaches.

Doesn’t Remind Me

If you listen to Audioslave and think “this sounds like a band I know, but I can’t quite place it” you are not alone. The band (arguably a supergroup, depending on your tastes) was made up of 3 members from Rage Against the Machine: Tom Morello, Tim Commerford, and Brad Wilk; and Chris Cornell the frontman for the well-known grunge band, Soundgarden who also had a successful solo career. Thus, my first impression when I heard Audioslave for the first time was that I had heard them before but didn’t know when. I think this very reason is why a number of critics disliked the band at first, stating that they sounded uninspired and predictable.

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It took a long time for me to get into Audioslave. I’ll admit, I’m not much into Rage Against the Machine, mostly because I have a hard time deciphering the lyrics and don’t usually like politically charged music. Audioslave has a completely different style for both of those categories. Chris Cornell specifically did not want to become the new singer for Rage Against, nor did he want to be a part of a political band, though he had no problem with playing benefits or performing more politically charged songs at times. He also has a very distinct voice that greatly differs from the style of Zach de la Rocha who sang for Rage Against the Machine.

When members come together from such different and iconic bands, there will obviously be an adjustment period for them to settle into a new sound distinct from their previous projects. Chris Cornell always sounded like Chris Cornell, but he stretched his vocals to include more and varied influences when he could, as did the rest of the band. Tom Morello said that while he was never musically limited with Rage Against the Machine, he felt there was wider musical territory with Audioslave.

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Obviously, Audioslave has influences from the band member’s previous bands. However, they have some other specific influences that I feel colors their music very well, such as Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, James Brown, and Funkadelic. They pulled heavily from 70’s hard rock and heavy metal, as well as some funk, soul, and R&B here and there. I would personally classify it as hard rock or alt-rock, though it could also be described as alt-metal and post-grunge.

If you listen to alt-rock radio stations, you are probably familiar with “Like A Stone” which is their most well-known song (ironic, since it was from their first and least critically acclaimed album). It is also my favorite song of theirs. I found myself drawn to the songs which had a little more grunge and a little less metal, such as “Doesn’t Remind Me” and “Shadow On The Sun” but that’s just my taste.

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If you like Rage Against the Machine, you will probably like Audioslave. I say this because the instrumentation, entirely by Rage Against band members, is all solid and well-mixed music. It really is quality work. Tim Commerford and Brad Wilk create a cohesive powerhouse together in all of the songs, and Tom Morello is a ridiculously talented guitarist.

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I think I’ve rambled on long enough for one post by now. So here are my top 5 Audioslave songs :

“Like A Stone”

“Show Me How To Live”

“Shadow On The Sun”

“Doesn’t Remind Me”

“Shape Of Things To Come”

And with that, I bid you farewell for today. Here’s to future music discoveries!

Post script: Chris Cornell was found dead in his hotel room earlier this year, after a Soundgarden show. May he rest in peace.

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Sweet Soul Music

The only song by Arthur Conley I was familiar with, “Sweet Soul Music,” is likely the only song by him that many people are familiar with.

I bet most people don’t know who he was, so here’s a short bio for you.

Arthur Conley did not have an illustrious career, though he was active for about 30 years. Like many soul artists, he got into singing through gospel choirs and moved along from there to a group called The Corvettes and then to his solo career, and was mentored and produced by Otis Redding. Eventually, he ended up moving to England and then Amsterdam, changing his name so as to live in peace with his secret of being gay, though the Dutch didn’t seem to care about that. He had a Dutch band for a little while, toured briefly and passed away at home in 2008.

So there’s that for you. But what I would rather talk about is his music. Honestly, it all sounds pretty much exactly like what you expect of soul music of the early 70’s, but there are a couple of songs that stood out to me.

“Sweet Soul Music” is absolutely my number one favorite, and you should really check it out. In fact, here’s a video link for you:

It references a number of well known Soul artists such as James Brown, Sam & Dave, Otis Redding, etc. and is very fun to sing along to. Plus, that trumpet refrain is just plain fun!

My second favorite is “Hearsay” and if you like that one, maybe take a listen to “You Really Know How To Hurt A Guy” and “Funky Street” as well.

Pretty good stuff, and if you are a fan of classic soul music, this is prime material to add to your library.

Thats all I really have for you today, so happy listening to that sweet soul music!